basketweaving craft suffolk
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textiles craft suffolk
musical instruments making suffolk
printmakers craft suffolk
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wood turning craft suffolk
glass craft suffolk
furniture makers suffolk
calligraphy craft suffolk
jewellery craft suffolk
ceramics craft suffolk

About Us >> 
 

The Suffolk Craft Society was formed in 1970 to promote the value and importance of contemporary crafts and to support individual craftspeople in the creation of their work. The Society supports around 140 makers with a wide variety of craft skills.  
 
 
Background 
 
The Society is best known for the summer exhibition of its makers' work it organises in Aldeburgh each year. The Society also seeks to promote and sell makers work through the Society run Gallery 2 in Ipswich Town Hall Galleries. Over the years occasional one-off events have been organised and smaller show case displays. The overriding aims of the Society are
 
To promote good design and fine workmanship in the crafts. 
To advance the careers of the Society’s craft makers. 
To recruit new makers who demonstrate excellence in their craft. 
To promote the education and training of craft workers. 
To inform and educate the public about the crafts. 
 
 
 
 
Organisation 
 
The Society has relied on a few dedicated makers and friends supported by a voluntary committee to organise and run the Society. It has become necessary to pay nominal fees to makers to organise and mount exhibitions, and also for some contract marketing activity, financial and secretarial assistance. Three organisational areas of priority have been identified and they are in the areas of trading, makers' services and education. 
 
Read on for a list of current personnel> 
 
 
Membership Benefits 
 
The abiding value of membership is being part of a network of shared interests and commitment. The Society seeks to enhance maker's status in the cultural sector and to share their experience with other makers and find a sympathetic audience to show their endeavours. A more tangible benefit is one of promoting and marketing makers' work while supporting the development of their creative work. Members have an entry in the Makers Directory on the website. 
 
This website has the capability to sell members' work over the Internet. The society is well placed to act as a broker to promote and negotiate the commissioning of craftwork for its makers. A Society Newsletter is produced three times a year. The Society aims to be able to offer the membership professional development support, particularly in areas of business and marketing advice with the possibility of creative mentoring for newer members. 
 
 
Education 
 
Education about and of the crafts the Society sees as an important way of promoting and introducing the values of quality craft to the public. While being more of a charitable service offered by the Society, it is recognised that the secondary benefits to the membership make it an important priority. The Society is well placed and has a wealth of talent in its membership to offer education programmes for schools, adults and professional development support to its own members. 
 
The Society is seeking partnership with local authorities and other organisations to implement an ongoing programme of workshops and residencies in schools. Likewise in the public sector similar projects for adults and families are planned, such as the IpArt series of craft workshops. Further, it is a desire of the Society to undertake exhibitions that have the expressed curatorial aims of being educational and informative rather than commercial. 
 
 
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